Club Calendar

Lightfoot Restaurant
Lightfoot Restaurant in downtown Leesburg across from the courthouse.

Are you interested in learning more about our club? Why not attend a meeting or join us at one of our upcoming community service projects? Everything is in the calendar; please contact us for more information. We’d love to meet you!

Until Covid-19 our club met at Lightfoot Restaurant on the first and third Thursdays of the month, 6 pm. We will return to dinner meetings when it is safe, but until then we meet on Zoom at 6:30 pm; contact the club for an invite link–guests, and visiting and transferring Kiwanians always are welcome.

June 2021

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At our March 18 meeting Nancy Rybicki, marine biologist and retired USGS Aquatic xx Ecologist, will speak about an invasive species of water chestnut in our watershed that could threaten the Potomac River. Learn about the threat and what you can do to help eradicate it.

Help Stop the Spread of a New Species of Water Chestnut (Trapa bispinosa):  Localities, pond management personnel and the general public are asked to look for a new species of Water Chestnut (genus Trapa) recently found in the Potomac Watershed. It has been spreading since 1995 so you may have already encountered this floating aquatic vegetation growing over the surface of a pond, lake or other fresh waterbody. This species (http://mdinvasives.org/iotm/july-2019/) is identified by the seed cases having two spines instead of four found in the Eurasian Water Chestnut. Reports of this or other invasive aquatic species can be made via the US Geological Survey Nonindigenous Aquatic Species web page, https://nas.er.usgs.gov/SightingReport.aspx.  Water Chestnut (an annual) will sprout in April and May, spread over the water surface and then flower and fruit by July; it drops seeds all season until it senesces after a hard frost. To stop the spread, management by harvesting the plants in July is very successful in eradicating the plants but it may take several years of effort, if some seeds lay dormant. Early detection helps reduce removal costs and ecological impacts. 

Distribution map (Trapa bispinosa): https://nas.er.usgs.gov/viewer/omap.aspx?id=f3a647f4-6906-4928-b5b4-1421cd95a211

Also see http://mdinvasives.org/iotm/july-2019/,   

Trapa bispinosa profile and distribution maps by Ian Pfingsten (USGS)(https://nas.er.usgs.gov/viewer/omap.aspx?id=f3a647f4-6906-4928-b5b4-1421cd95a211),Virginia or https://nas.er.usgs.gov/queries/SpeciesAnimatedMap.aspx?speciesID=2974, and The Virginia Plant Atlas(http://vaplantatlas.org/index.php?do=plant&plant=4646&search=Search).  

 It’s been in the media on ABC7 news https://wjla.com/news/local/invasive-plant-species-potomac-watershed  

If you have any questions let me know.  

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